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to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
southeast. stretching from mississippi and into the carolinas today. and the flood level is at minor or moderate level, which is going to be upping the risk of any kind of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. but it looks like it's going to be continuing the next couple days. we still have the monsoonal showers here, but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have the red flag warnings still in place in much of the west. take a look at these temperatures soaring into the 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging up here. toronto looking at 32 degrees. well above the average range. here across europe, the system is in the weakening trend, but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covers much of western and central portions here. geneva, you're actually going to see that temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. this is going to be on the rising trend. now for your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes t
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
georgia and areas of mississippi and alabama, too, especially the southern portions near the gulf as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next couple of days. by far the southeast is a travel trouble spot in the northeast if you left the windows open last night you may have had to close them in the middle of the night. we're in the mid-50s in the city, 40s in some of the suburbs. feels like fall but it will be a beautiful afternoon, thomas, we showed you d.c. there, i mean, you do vacations in d.c. mid-august, you're prepared for like heat, humidity, gross. 80 and low humidity enjoy it. >> i grew up in baltimore so i know all about gross, i do. bill thanks so much. >>> coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe" we'll take you live to egypt as the military continues its crackdown on the muslim brotherhood protest. we'll discuss the options that remain for u.s. action. >>> and then we come back we huddle around the water cooler, a new tactic in the push to get san diego mayor bob filner out of office, the parcy video that you need to see and hear after this. right now, 7 years
nuclear plant on the mississippi river in louisiana. barbed wire fencing, roaming s.w.a.t. teams, double-sealed doors and hardened concrete protect the nuclear core and the pool that holds spent fuel rods. but because the nation's plants are at least 30 years old, often with communities nearby, experts say hardening them to 20 century standards would be both costly and challenging. nationwide, 65 of 100 working reactors sit within close proximity to population centers, one in three americans lives within 50 miles of a nuclear reactor, including new york, boston, philly, charlotte, chicago, miami, baton rouge, and san diego. 50 miles is considered the potential contamination zone. today the nuclear regulatory commission insisted it has strengthened security requirements for commercial nuclear power plants and remains confident that these important facilities are adequately protected. while reactors may remain a target, any new security requirements are now highly unlikely. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> the stock market got pummeled today, the worst day's drop in eight weeks, tri
fell in areas. gulfport, mississippi, was swamped. flooding forced the first day of school in washington county, florida, to be canceled. san diego mayor bob fillner is expected back at city hall to. he has been out of sight since announcing in july that he would seek therapy cunce announcing in july him of sexual harassment. as carter evans reports, fillner now faces a fight to keep his job. >> hey hey, ho, ho. he has got to go. >> the drive to recall san sand-- san diego mayor bob filner is officially under way. >> our petitions for recall are here. >> on the eve of his return to the city hall. >> what is it going to be like in the workplace when the mayor is back in the hallways? >> it's going to be awkward, and there's going to be some tension. >> reporter: city attorney jan goldsmith says the mayor cannot undo the damage he's already done. and he gave this warning to filner when he does return, behave or else. >> we're to the going to just sit back and let him have the run of city hall without having some protections for our employees. that's our obligation. >> reporte
with a dollop of daisy. ♪ do a dollop of daisy >>> take a look at the scene in gulfport, mississippi. a storm hit during a church service. and so much rain fell so fast, that worshipers became stranded inside of their church. about six inches of rain fell in about two hours. the only time the flooding there was worse was during hurricane katrina. >> and wearing the sunday best. >>> all right. let's take a look at the road conditions. it will be wet along the gulf coast and in the southeast again today. flooding is possible there once again. and rain also could make things difficult for parts of the southwest and the rockies. >> staying in the southwest. if you're flying, it won't be any surprise there will be some delays there. also in the southeast, in atlanta, charlotte and new orleans. >>> new details this morning of a fiery incident on a los angeles freeway that involved actor dick van dyke. >> home video shows the 87-year-old actor's late model jaguar charred after it somehow caught fire and then exploded. abc's gio benitez has the story. >> "the dick van dyke show." >> reporter: he's th
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
and massachusetts google the most. people in mississippi, arkansas and west virginia google the least. >> facebook wants to get more of the world's 7 billion people online through a partnership with cell phone companies. facebook announced a partnership called internet.org. the company says its goal is to "make internet access available to the two-thirds of the world who are not yet connected." the group's plans include developing cheaper smartphones and using mobile data more efficiently. >> the testing company act says just a quarter of this year's high school graduates who took the act tests have the reading, math, english and science skills they need to succeed in college or a career. the results indicate that thousands of students graduate from high schools without the knowledge necessary for the next steps in life. the data also show a downturn in overall student scores, although company officials attribute the slide to updated standards and more students taking the exams - including those with no intention of attending two- or four-year colleges. >> teenagers aren't going to amusement parks
. this is during a routine dive in mississippi. this is a 66-year-old who was doing a tandem dive. the student is in critical condition with broken bones and a head injury. the owner said the instructor cut away his main parachute and used backup but it's not clear what went wrong. the faa is investigating this along with local authorities. >>> a man who saw a car mow down 13 pedestrians, this is on l.a.'s venice beach. the driver was looking for blood. >> reporter: you see the suspect's car plowing in and swerving around barriers. >> the just drove and took that barrier down and bodies were scattering and flying in the air and people were screaming and it was absolute mayhem. >> reporter: a second camera angle shows the driver getting out casing the boardwalk. ghets back in and floors it. >> he has to have pressed foot to the gas because tires started screeching. he was looking for blood. that guy's intention was to kill people. >> reporter: an italian tourist on her honeymoon was killed and 11 others injured in a scene a quarter mile long. the suspect is nathan campbell of los angeles. just
marijuana cigarettes rolled by the federal government grown at the university of mississippi and sent out to dispensaries every month. this isn't that hard. all we have to do is have the president of the united states change it from schedule one to two and bring it under the controls we have and therefore pharmacies could dispence it. they have saves. we already have the system in place. and if our government has been testing it, growing it, and selling it for 37 years, how long is it going to take them to figure out? >> there is a hypocrisy here, piers. it's amazing. that is an example of the hypocrisy the united states government also owns a patent on marijuana as a medical application. montel has it here. so we have a patent through our department of health and human services on marijuana as a therapeutic and scheduled as a schedule one saying it has no medical application. >> look, we'll go to the break, i promised now. we'll come back with the director of adolescence substance abuse program and the chair of the american academy of pediatrics. she has a different view and i'm sure it
. >> it depends in the context of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60 sglsh mississippi. >> not only that a student of my history. i said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word. i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people who i'm connected to, ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who have come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> well, we had a fascinating conversation. we'll have more on my interview tomorrow on "360." it opens tomorrow. >>> the custody battle over veronica may be near a breaking pointment the adopted parents are in oklahoma tonight trying to bring her home. the lawyers from both s
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
% of adults were obese in 13 states. the top states on the list weree mississippi, and louisiana with nearly 35% of adults obese. the state with the lowest numbers was colorado with less than 21%. >>> the more time you spend on facebook, the unhappier youu become. apparently those had were the results of the study, measuring the social network impact on the users sco psychological well be they found interacting withg people directly either face toto face or over the phone actually made the participants happier.ci you know, what that is one theoe of the things with this generation, everybody is on a phone. >> it's the same with e-mail, nobody is writing a letter, fewer people are making calls, your phone doesn't ring as much, everybody text you, e-mails you and sends you something through facebook. chill out, putso the phone downone and talk. >>> as we continue to the 5,5, warrants reveal new information on the relationship between the california teen and the man whoo abducted her. he >>> and an emotional day in moore oklahoma as students whosh lives were devastated by a deadly tornado return
in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i think, you know, in the moment where the clearance williams
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
to him happened in mississippi in 195 5. he was 14. a lot of people see this film and think about our new cycle stand your ground and stop and frisk and trayvon martin and brings up that talking point is there justice right now? really great part in the film where they talk about, you know, the young seizele gaicecil gain. he is saying the law was against us and not on our side. i think trayvon martin's family and other people would feel that way today. >> "the butler" takes a look at the inner workings at the white house in the past. we know oprah has modern day ties to this white house, the obama administration. listen to this. >> look at all of those administrations compared to obama. i mean, obama will stand alone because of what that represented for the country. i was so pleased that during the process of this interview, a white reporter sitting in the very chair you're sitting in saying he didn't realize until seeing this movie the depth of the importance of obama, but seeing that movie in the context of the civil rights movement, now allows him to see, wow, that is really bigger th
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
? your answer, just two. iowa and mississippi. hat tip to our friend jonathan martin at the "new york times" for that factoid. congratulations, by the way. today's winner jamie. trivia suggestion to "the daily rundown"@msnbc.com. we'll be right back. announcer ] made just a little sweeter... because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. >>> we're back now with more of the daily rundown. you heard it from mike and brad the fight over health care will be driving a lot of the conversation as soon as congress gets back to work. we learned today the obama administration is delaying another portion of the president's signature health care reform act a piece of the law that limits out of pocket costs meaning how much of their own money individuals could be forced to spend on health care another grace period before that part of the obama care would go into effect. joining us is our gaggle. karen and ann and kristen is with us. ann, ask you first. the delay comes afte
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
of him. they gouged out this kid's eye. it was a horrible tragedy in mississippi. >> it's so easy during this time. trayvon martin paralleled to him. you get stuck in that and not allow yourself to move forward and see how far we've come. >> there is no comparison. >> it's a baseless claim. but getting back to her in switzerland, there's a pattern here. in 2005 in paris at a hermes store -- is that how you pronounce it? >> i wear jeans and sneakers. >> the store closed. oprah wants to go shopping. they told her she couldn't. she had a hissy fit and she screamed racism. >> i thought it was true. i remember that story. i remember thinking it was horrible. >> but there's video of it. and there's a statement from the store that said this is what happened. but oprah injected race into it. >> well, again -- >> can't compare trayvon. >> i wasn't there and neither was dineen. >> but you can't compare trayvon. emetil was a rascist, vicious hate crime murder. that's not the same thing. >> a lot of african-americans, not all, certainly not all, but a lot do feel that this is a very modern day versi
on the mississippi border. the gunman eventually let one woman go. but the cops say the guy complained to them that he had voices in his head. and blamed his ex-girlfriend's family for inserting some sort of device in his brain he has mad at people. he was mad at people that he said were mean to him. >> mean to him. the standoff went on for nearly 12 hours. when the suspect told negotiators he was planning to kill his remaining hostages, state police stormed the building. investigators say the gunman shot both of the hostages. killed one, wounded the other. and then police shot him dead i mentioned the cartoon he apparently posted on his facebook several days ago. a police negotiator who can't be bothered to save a hostage. investigators say they also found a list of demands in the gunman's bank. the shooter did not want anybody to arrest him or providemental health treatment. competed to see who could give him the best campaign killers. that accusation today from debbie roe the singer's ex-wife and the mother of two of his children paris and prince. debbie roe testified today as part of a law
and watches in effect all across the southeast in georgia and florida, parts of mississippi and alabama too. it's this stalled front and that moisture coming in off the gulf. it is going to try to make its way in the mid-atlantic. a couple light spotty >> and that's your latest forecast. lester. >> dylan, thanks. up next on "today," oscar pistorius, the double-amputee accused of murdering his high-profile girlfriend making a court appearance tomorrow. that's right after this. i like a clean kitchen. i don't do any cleaning. i make dirt. ♪ very, very heavy. i'm not big enough or strong enough for this. there should be some way to make it easier. [ doorbell rings ] [ morty ] here's a box, babe. open it up. oh my goodness! what is a wetjet? some kind of a mopping device. there's a lot of dirt on here. morty, look at how easy it is. it's almost like dancing. [ both humming ] this is called the swiffer dance. softens the enamel so it can potentially erode. once that enamel is gone, it's gone. my dentist recommended pronamel. pronamel protects your teeth from the effects of acid erosion. i don'
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
rate. in fact, only five states have a higher one. nevada, illinois, mississippi, rhode island and north carolina. pretty stunning. by the way, christie has kept a football field's worth of distance between himself and controversial gop senate nominee. but finally decide to endorse him at an event on tuesday. the first and last time chris christie probably campaigning with him. washington chief correspondent dan balls. and political eder to for the degreo.com harry bacon jr. and liz showny from the associated press. mr. balls, we have dined out on candidates starting presidential campaigns early for decades. in some ways, we love it as political junkies. what's surprising is when front-runners who don't need to do it dip in too early. hillary clinton, dipping too fast? >> i'm not sure. i think you're right. part of this is driven by us. >> doesn't take much to feed -- >> our april tied petite to get next campaign grows so that's part of it. the other is could she avoid it anyway? she's being drawn into the conversation in a sense whether she contributes to it or not. the fact t
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
some time with senator eastland fromto mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. dithe fact is, you learned within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagreed, and that in turn was great preparation for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. th that's gone. we now have a rigidly -conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at political engagement and civic actionht. how did that change and how does -does that fit into the kind of -that we're talking about here in washington. we're talking about here in washington. here atable, as they wouldble, as they w say in the senate, my friends here my distinguished friends and colleagues. i think they're absolutely righto make s that we want to make sense of -what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change ise is the 60's and 70's and that was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establ
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